@4HNYC Helping Haiti HH

Impacting our World by Social Charitable Giving

57 notes

haitianhistory:

Rare Photos of Dumarsais Estimé’s Presidency (1946-1950). Images: Courtesy of CIDIHCA.

Following the United States Marine Occupation of Haiti (1915-1934) the Haitian military, Gendarmerie d’Haïti (later known simply as Garde d’Haïti), received major transformations, from what, by the turn of the last century, was a decentralized and often unorganized coalition, to a modern military force. While the army was key in protecting the regimes of Sténio Vincent (1930-1941) and Élie Lescot (1941-1946), it was through the election of 1946, that which brought moderate noiriste Dumarsais Estimé in power that it was able to test its strength as arbiter of Haitian politics. 

Ironically, the same men who installed Estimé in power later disposed of him due to disputes and Estimé’s attempt to stretch his presidency. He was replaced by Paul Eugène Magloire, one of the key military figures behind the 1946 junta.  (Sources: XX and X)

50 notes

lamus-dworski:

Poles in Haiti - Polish legions in the Haitian war of independence (1802-1803)

Located in the Department of Grande Anse and not too far from the Haitian Capital, Port-au-Prince, Cazale (also spelled Cazales/Casale) is a small village in Haiti. It is mainly agricultural. One thing distinctly unique about Cazale is its large Polish influence.

In 1802, the Napoleon army who came to Santo Domingo to fight the slave rebellion, included a Polish legion. There were about 5200 Poles sent to Saint Domingue by Napoleon. The Polish officers were told that there was a revolt in Saint-Domingue; however, upon arrival, the Polish brigade realized that the rebellion that they were informed of by the Napoleon army was actually slaves in the Colony fighting for their freedom.

At that time, there was a similar war going on in Poland. these polish soldiers were fighting back home for the liberation of their own country. In 1772, 1793 and 1795 Russia, Prussia (Germany) and Austria were subsequently invading Poland, resulting in the infamous Partitions of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, when it disappeared from the maps. Many Poles, hopeful of uniting in some way to win back Polish territory, made alliance with France and joined Napoleon’s army, but as distinct Polish units.

Many Polish soldiers decided to leave the French army and join the slave rebellion. They all settled in Casale, La Vallee de Jacmel, Fond des Blancs, La Baleine, Port Salut and St. Jean du Sud. Several Polish soldiers participated in the Haitian revolution of 1804 [read more: the disastrous Haitian campaign]. The Polish soldiers acquired Haitian citizenship after Haiti’s Independence, settled there to never return home. Even today, you can find Haitian Poles, blue eyed, blond, with European features.

Now turning the page into the Duvalier era. Casale became a stronghold for communism and many young intellectuals in the region were in direct conflict with François Duvalier's regime. as a consequence, March 29, 1969 came to be known as the worst day for the people of Casale. With the help of his Tonton Macoute [private army], Duvalier built a barricade around Casale, and murdered many young guys.

Pope John Paul II who visited Haiti in 1983, mentioned the Polish contribution to the Slave rebellion leading to Haiti’s independence. Several Haitian Poles from Cazale, La Vallée-de-Jacmel, Fond-des-Blancs, La Baleine, Port Salut and Saint-Jean-du-Sud were selected by the Duvalier regime to attend the various ceremonies organized for the Pope visit." [text source]

On pictures:

  1. January Suchodolski (1797-1875): “Battle at San Domingo”, 1845. [source]
  2. Visit of the Pope John Paul II in Port-au-Prince, March 1983. Descendants of the Polish soldiers holding an image of the Our Lady of Częstochowa (also called the Black Madonna of Częstochowa), one the holiest paintings of Polish Catholic Church. [source]
  3. Inhabitants of the “Polish village” in Haiti; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]
  4. One of typical houses in Cazale, Haiti - resembling Polish rural architecture in form; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]
  5. Inhabitants of the “Polish village” in Haiti; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]
  6. Joseph Merlo Delice and his cousin, Michel Delice are playing dominoes with a visitor from Poland. One of the few pastimes available in this mountain village; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]
  7. One of houses in Cazale; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]
  8. Mme Exavier Rosandre. Cazale village; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]

To watch // Do obejrzenia:

// Fundacja Polska-Haiti

4 notes

midwivesforhaiti:

There are 456 more days until the Millennium Development Goals draw to a close and here are the facts:Fact: Haiti has reduced under five mortality and maternal mortality (MDGs 4 and 5) but will fall far from global goals.Fact: Haiti’s current workforce meets only 10% of the full reproductive health needs of Haitian women. Fact: Midwives For Haiti is working to increase the number of skilled birth attendants because access to skilled care saves lives. Fact: Healthy babies and healthy mothers make our heart smile.

midwivesforhaiti:

There are 456 more days until the Millennium Development Goals draw to a close and here are the facts:
Fact: Haiti has reduced under five mortality and maternal mortality (MDGs 4 and 5) but will fall far from global goals.
Fact: Haiti’s current workforce meets only 10% of the full reproductive health needs of Haitian women.
Fact: Midwives For Haiti is working to increase the number of skilled birth attendants because access to skilled care saves lives.
Fact: Healthy babies and healthy mothers make our heart smile.



(Source: midwivesforhaiti.org)

24 notes

4hnyc:

Class is in session!

4HNYC was beyond pleased to receive pictures from The Children of Haiti Project’s book bag distribution. A special thanks goes out to all of our supporters for their continuous support and generosity. As a result of your kindness, 4HNYC was able to sponsor 200 Kenbe La students in Port-au-Prince and Leogane, Haiti. Each student received a book bag filled with school supplies for the 2014-2015 school year.

Statistics tells us that 50% of primary school age children in Haiti are not enrolled in school, approximately 30% of children attending primary school will not make it to third grade, and 60% will abandon school before sixth grade. Currently, 37.9% of the Haitian population is unable to read or write (the rest of Latin America has a 12% illiteracy rate).

We at 4HNYC believe that every child deserves a chance to succeed regardless of their economical state. Thank you for also believing in our vision. We wish all of the students in Haiti a prosperous and successful academic year. Happy learning.


Kenbe La—- Never Give Up!

Cheers,

4HNYC

Interested in joining our movement, contact us via 4hnycgives@gmail.com for more information. We look forward to hearing from you.

(via 4hnyc)

24 notes

4hnyc:

Class is in session!

4HNYC was beyond pleased to receive pictures from The Children of Haiti Project’s book bag distribution. A special thanks goes out to all of our supporters for their continuous support and generosity. As a result of your kindness, 4HNYC was able to sponsor 200 Kenbe La students in Port-au-Prince and Leogane, Haiti. Each student received a book bag filled with school supplies for the 2014-2015 school year.

Statistics tells us that 50% of primary school age children in Haiti are not enrolled in school, approximately 30% of children attending primary school will not make it to third grade, and 60% will abandon school before sixth grade. Currently, 37.9% of the Haitian population is unable to read or write (the rest of Latin America has a 12% illiteracy rate).

We at 4HNYC believe that every child deserves a chance to succeed regardless of their economical state. Thank you for also believing in our vision. We wish all of the students in Haiti a prosperous and successful academic year. Happy learning.


Kenbe La—- Never Give Up!

Cheers,

4HNYC

Interested in joining our movement, contact us via 4hnycgives@gmail.com for more information. We look forward to hearing from you.

(via stablemoves)