@4HNYC Helping Haiti HH

Impacting our World by Social Charitable Giving

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4hnyc:

A special thanks goes out to all of our supporters for their continuous support and generosity. As a result of your kindness, 4HNYC is able to sponsor 200 Kenbe La students in Port-au-Prince and Leogane, Haiti. Each student will receive a book bag filled with school supplies for the upcoming school year. We at 4HNYC believe that every child deserves a chance to succeed regardless of their economical state. Thank you for also believing in our vision.

Kenbe La—- Never Give Up!

Cheers,

4HNYC Team
www.facebook.com/4hnyc

For more details about 4HNYC, please contact 4hnycgives@gmail.com

Interested in joining our team? We would love to have you! Contact us via 4hnycgive@gmail.com

(via 4hnyc)

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haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - August 14, 1791 - Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony. 
While historians still debate how many slaves took part of the infamous Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony (or if it even occurred), very few would deny the emblematic value of the event. Indeed, various accounts maintain that it was precisely during this service that slaves in Northern Saint-Domingue prepared and organized for a major uprising against slave-owners. This uprising soon transformed itself into a large-scale Revolution across the country where temporary associationswere made and destroyed - a moment that we now refer to as the Haitian Revolution.
 * While the events that led to the formation of the Haitian state should not be reduced to a Vodou ceremony, Bois Caïman still, if only symbolically, marks the beginning of a new era and conscience amongst slaves in Saint-Domingue, whereby they agreed that death was better than servitude.
Painting of Bois Caïman Vodou ceremony with Boukman Dutty in its center: Courtesy of Michigan State University. (For reading suggestions on the Haitian Revolution, see here.) 

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - August 14, 1791 - Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony. 

While historians still debate how many slaves took part of the infamous Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony (or if it even occurred), very few would deny the emblematic value of the event. Indeed, various accounts maintain that it was precisely during this service that slaves in Northern Saint-Domingue prepared and organized for a major uprising against slave-owners. This uprising soon transformed itself into a large-scale Revolution across the country where temporary associationswere made and destroyed - a moment that we now refer to as the Haitian Revolution.

 * While the events that led to the formation of the Haitian state should not be reduced to a Vodou ceremony, Bois Caïman still, if only symbolically, marks the beginning of a new era and conscience amongst slaves in Saint-Domingue, whereby they agreed that death was better than servitude.

Painting of Bois Caïman Vodou ceremony with Boukman Dutty in its center: Courtesy of Michigan State University. (For reading suggestions on the Haitian Revolution, see here.) 

728 notes

One misconception outsiders have about Haiti, or any so-called “third world” country, is that poverty is all there is. Reality tells a different story. People live, die, get married, lose their virginity, graduate high school and college, dream and strive in Haiti. There are, in fact, many possibilities.

Haitians are humans, not symbols of poverty. But you shouldn’t have to go to Haiti to find that out.

The Slaves of Saint-Domingue Did Not Dream, They Exploded by Ferrari Sheppard (via caribbeancivilisation)

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haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - August 13, 1943 - Birth of Haitian President Ertha Pascal-Trouillot.
In 1990, while still in the midst of a very tense political situation following the departure of Jean-Claude Duvalier four years earlier, Ertha Pascal-Trouillot was chosen as the next Head of state of Haiti. While some do not deem her election particularly spectacular, as she was only an acting President and stayed in power eleven months, Trouillot’s nomination is still significant (regardless of her falling outs with other Haitian officials) since she was the first  (and remains the only) woman ever elected President of the Haitian Republic. Trouillot was succeeded by Jean-Bertrand Aristide. 
Original Image: Courtesy of Haitian-Reference.

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - August 13, 1943 - Birth of Haitian President Ertha Pascal-Trouillot.

In 1990, while still in the midst of a very tense political situation following the departure of Jean-Claude Duvalier four years earlier, Ertha Pascal-Trouillot was chosen as the next Head of state of Haiti. While some do not deem her election particularly spectacular, as she was only an acting President and stayed in power eleven months, Trouillot’s nomination is still significant (regardless of her falling outs with other Haitian officials) since she was the first  (and remains the only) woman ever elected President of the Haitian Republic. Trouillot was succeeded by Jean-Bertrand Aristide. 

Original Image: Courtesy of Haitian-Reference.

(via haitiana)

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haitianphoenix:

"Did you know that there were Haitians recruited to fight in World War II for the United States? In the early 1940s, an ad appeared in a Haitian newspaper recruiting 40 pilots for training at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

We know for sure that at least 6 pilots went for training at the Tuskegee Institute, and most of them were in the Haitian Army or Airforce. And we know their names: 
Ludovic Audant 
Philippe Célestin 
Raymond Cassagnol 
Eberle J. Guilbaud 
Nicolas Pelissier 
Alix Pasquet” 
#knowthyself #knowyourhistory #haiti #ayiti #WWII #usa #war #theydontteachthis
#haitianphoenix #love #me #history #sakpasse #haitiansbelike #teamhaiti #teamayiti #blackhistory

haitianphoenix:

"Did you know that there were Haitians recruited to fight in World War II for the United States? In the early 1940s, an ad appeared in a Haitian newspaper recruiting 40 pilots for training at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

We know for sure that at least 6 pilots went for training at the Tuskegee Institute, and most of them were in the Haitian Army or Airforce. And we know their names:
Ludovic Audant
Philippe Célestin
Raymond Cassagnol
Eberle J. Guilbaud
Nicolas Pelissier
Alix Pasquet”
#knowthyself #knowyourhistory #haiti #ayiti #WWII #usa #war #theydontteachthis
#haitianphoenix #love #me #history #sakpasse #haitiansbelike #teamhaiti #teamayiti #blackhistory

68 notes

haitianhistory:


Paul Robeson and Ruby Elzy in the 1933 film adaptation of The Emperor Jones (based on Eugene O’Neill play by the same name)

Haiti and Images of Black Nationhood
"The work of art that perhaps galvanised the Harlem Renaissance’s fascination with black nationhood (and black leadership) was Eugene O’Neill’s 1920 play, The Emperor Jones. A thinly veiled drama about the failures of Henri Christophe’s despotic reign over the island of Haiti, The Emperor Jones was an important vehicle not only for actors like Charles Gilpin and Paul Robeson, but also for visual artists as well (Aaron Douglas’s blockprint illustrations for the play in 1926 and Dudley Murphy’s film treatment of the play in 1933). Although The Emperor Jones presented the idea of black nationhood and leadership in a negative, racially atavistic light (no doubt with Marcus Garvey’s ‘Africa for Africans’ rhetoric and his failed attempts at nation building in mind), its focus on black agency and independence was not lost on Harlem Renaissance audiences.”
"The history propaganda and mystique that surrounded Haiti - beginning with the US military invasion and occupation of the island in 1915 - took on a life of its own during the Harlem Renaissance. In addition to The Emperor Jones, scores of novels, plays, ethnographic studies and journalistic exposés used Haiti and its peoples for a range of purposes. While Haiti’s tortured political history and its cultural links to certain African traditions were viewed by many commentators as evidence of its geo-political weakness and savagery, these same attributes wee viewed by others as reasons for recognising the political power among all peoples of African descent and celebrating Africa’s gifts (via Haiti) to world culture. With the removal of the US Marines from Haiti in 1934, this fascination with the island and its mythologies manifested itself in interesting ways, from Josephine Baker’s staged musical portrayal of a caged Haitian songbird in the 1934 film Zou Zou, to two major off Broadway plays dealing with black political intrigue, Haitian style: John Houseman’s and Orson Welles’s Black Macbeth (1936) and William DuBois’s Haiti (1938)."
Read full piece at the Institute of International Visual Arts.
Original Image: Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

haitianhistory:

Paul Robeson and Ruby Elzy in the 1933 film adaptation of The Emperor Jones (based on Eugene O’Neill play by the same name)

Haiti and Images of Black Nationhood

"The work of art that perhaps galvanised the Harlem Renaissance’s fascination with black nationhood (and black leadership) was Eugene O’Neill’s 1920 play, The Emperor Jones. A thinly veiled drama about the failures of Henri Christophe’s despotic reign over the island of Haiti, The Emperor Jones was an important vehicle not only for actors like Charles Gilpin and Paul Robeson, but also for visual artists as well (Aaron Douglas’s blockprint illustrations for the play in 1926 and Dudley Murphy’s film treatment of the play in 1933). Although The Emperor Jones presented the idea of black nationhood and leadership in a negative, racially atavistic light (no doubt with Marcus Garvey’s ‘Africa for Africans’ rhetoric and his failed attempts at nation building in mind), its focus on black agency and independence was not lost on Harlem Renaissance audiences.”

"The history propaganda and mystique that surrounded Haiti - beginning with the US military invasion and occupation of the island in 1915 - took on a life of its own during the Harlem Renaissance. In addition to The Emperor Jones, scores of novels, plays, ethnographic studies and journalistic exposés used Haiti and its peoples for a range of purposes. While Haiti’s tortured political history and its cultural links to certain African traditions were viewed by many commentators as evidence of its geo-political weakness and savagery, these same attributes wee viewed by others as reasons for recognising the political power among all peoples of African descent and celebrating Africa’s gifts (via Haiti) to world culture. With the removal of the US Marines from Haiti in 1934, this fascination with the island and its mythologies manifested itself in interesting ways, from Josephine Baker’s staged musical portrayal of a caged Haitian songbird in the 1934 film Zou Zou, to two major off Broadway plays dealing with black political intrigue, Haitian style: John Houseman’s and Orson Welles’s Black Macbeth (1936) and William DuBois’s Haiti (1938)."

Read full piece at the Institute of International Visual Arts.

Original Image: Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.