@4HNYC Helping Haiti HH

Impacting our World by Social Charitable Giving

19 notes

4hnyc:

Class is in session!

4HNYC was beyond pleased to receive pictures from The Children of Haiti Project’s book bag distribution. A special thanks goes out to all of our supporters for their continuous support and generosity. As a result of your kindness, 4HNYC was able to sponsor 200 Kenbe La students in Port-au-Prince and Leogane, Haiti. Each student received a book bag filled with school supplies for the 2014-2015 school year.

Statistics tells us that 50% of primary school age children in Haiti are not enrolled in school, approximately 30% of children attending primary school will not make it to third grade, and 60% will abandon school before sixth grade. Currently, 37.9% of the Haitian population is unable to read or write (the rest of Latin America has a 12% illiteracy rate).

We at 4HNYC believe that every child deserves a chance to succeed regardless of their economical state. Thank you for also believing in our vision. We wish all of the students in Haiti a prosperous and successful academic year. Happy learning.


Kenbe La—- Never Give Up!

Cheers,

4HNYC

Interested in joining our movement, contact us via 4hnycgives@gmail.com for more information. We look forward to hearing from you.

(via 4hnyc)

296 notes

hifructosemag:

Kehinde Wiley’s (Hi-Fructose Vol. 29) opulent portraiture subtly stirs the status quo. As an American artist, Wiley honed his craft in accordance with a legacy of Euro-centric art history that left him simultaneously awed and alienated. One would be hard-pressed to find a grandiose portrait of a person of color in the works of the Renaissance masters in the Met or the Louvre. This is the motivating factor of Wiley’s oeuvre: to elevate images of average people of African descent through his ornate depictions, exposing the singular beauty of his subjects through dramatic compositions that evoke the Baroque period.

While he started out this aesthetic exploration by scouting subjects in major US cities, Wiley’s art has taken him all over the world to work with people of the global African diaspora. His latest series, “The World Stage: Haiti” is currently on view at Roberts & Tilton Gallery in Culver City and features 12 new paintings based on his recent travels. Read more on Hi-Fructose

19 notes

4hnyc:

Class is in session!

4HNYC was beyond pleased to receive pictures from The Children of Haiti Project’s book bag distribution. A special thanks goes out to all of our supporters for their continuous support and generosity. As a result of your kindness, 4HNYC was able to sponsor 200 Kenbe La students in Port-au-Prince and Leogane, Haiti. Each student received a book bag filled with school supplies for the 2014-2015 school year.

Statistics tells us that 50% of primary school age children in Haiti are not enrolled in school, approximately 30% of children attending primary school will not make it to third grade, and 60% will abandon school before sixth grade. Currently, 37.9% of the Haitian population is unable to read or write (the rest of Latin America has a 12% illiteracy rate).

We at 4HNYC believe that every child deserves a chance to succeed regardless of their economical state. Thank you for also believing in our vision. We wish all of the students in Haiti a prosperous and successful academic year. Happy learning.


Kenbe La—- Never Give Up!

Cheers,

4HNYC

Interested in joining our movement, contact us via 4hnycgives@gmail.com for more information. We look forward to hearing from you.

(via 4hnyc)

19 notes

4hnyc:

Class is in session!

4HNYC was beyond pleased to receive pictures from The Children of Haiti Project’s book bag distribution. A special thanks goes out to all of our supporters for their continuous support and generosity. As a result of your kindness, 4HNYC was able to sponsor 200 Kenbe La students in Port-au-Prince and Leogane, Haiti. Each student received a book bag filled with school supplies for the 2014-2015 school year.

Statistics tells us that 50% of primary school age children in Haiti are not enrolled in school, approximately 30% of children attending primary school will not make it to third grade, and 60% will abandon school before sixth grade. Currently, 37.9% of the Haitian population is unable to read or write (the rest of Latin America has a 12% illiteracy rate).

We at 4HNYC believe that every child deserves a chance to succeed regardless of their economical state. Thank you for also believing in our vision. We wish all of the students in Haiti a prosperous and successful academic year. Happy learning.


Kenbe La—- Never Give Up!

Cheers,

4HNYC

Interested in joining our movement, contact us via 4hnycgives@gmail.com for more information. We look forward to hearing from you.

(via ruramairose)

39 notes

haitianhistory:


Jonathas Granville by Philip Thomas Coke Tilyard, 1824.

Jonathas Granville was a special emigration agent under the Boyer administration (1818-1843). In 1824, he began touring the United States from Philadelphia in hopes of co-ordinating efforts for the emigration of free American blacks to Haiti. This portrait was executed the same year by American artist Philip Thomas Coke Tilyard. Many question whether this portrait actually resembles the man in any form. 
Edited: 6-09-14 // Original Image: Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. 

haitianhistory:

Jonathas Granville by Philip Thomas Coke Tilyard, 1824.

Jonathas Granville was a special emigration agent under the Boyer administration (1818-1843). In 1824, he began touring the United States from Philadelphia in hopes of co-ordinating efforts for the emigration of free American blacks to Haiti. This portrait was executed the same year by American artist Philip Thomas Coke Tilyard. Many question whether this portrait actually resembles the man in any form. 

Edited: 6-09-14 // Original Image: Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

11 notes


Following the October 1929 student strikes, general demonstrations and insurrections in the following months, Washington was forced into reviewing its position in the Republic of Haiti. The Forbes Commission,presided by William Cameron Forbes held hearings in the country in hopes of investigating the situation and better advise the Hoover administration in its policy in Haiti. Aside from rapid “Haitianization” and other concerns, the Commission also recommended the gradual withdrawal of American Marines form Haiti, as their presence had become too unpopular in almost every sectors of Haitian society. This Commission was of significant importance in Haitian/American relations and, amongst other factors, did lead the the “end” of the Marine occupation of Haiti. The full document is available at the University of Florida Digital Collections.   

Following the October 1929 student strikes, general demonstrations and insurrections in the following months, Washington was forced into reviewing its position in the Republic of Haiti. The Forbes Commission,presided by William Cameron Forbes held hearings in the country in hopes of investigating the situation and better advise the Hoover administration in its policy in Haiti. Aside from rapid “Haitianization” and other concerns, the Commission also recommended the gradual withdrawal of American Marines form Haiti, as their presence had become too unpopular in almost every sectors of Haitian society. This Commission was of significant importance in Haitian/American relations and, amongst other factors, did lead the the “end” of the Marine occupation of Haiti. The full document is available at the University of Florida Digital Collections.   

(Source: haitianhistory)

57 notes

haitianhistory:

Some of the many faces of 20th century Haitian women’s activism. From left to right: Emmeline Carries-Lemaire, Leonie Coicou-Madiou, Janine Lafontant-Nelson, Lydia Jeanty, Yvonne Hakime Rimpel and Madeleine Sylvain-Bouchereau. Dates Unknown. images: Courtesy of CIDIHCA.

While their contribution is often forgotten and/or neglected, these women (and others) shared a similar conviction and worked, in their own fashion, for greater justice in Haitian society.

To provide few blatant examples, though the popular demonstrations in many cities during the Forbes Commission of 1930 are often discussed, rarely is there a mention of women who also seized this opportunity to protest and demand more rights within Haitian society. Similarly, while the “Revolution of 1946" is usually regarded as an event putting together protagonists of the Noirisme movement and members of the Haitian left, the role of women, who frequently assisted their male peers, is often obscured and rarely studied independently. Additionally, by 1957, despite the threat of violence (and often, at the risk of rape) many women dared to defy the Duvalier dictatorship by speaking openly against the regime. Although not every women embraced the title “feminist,” the few figures included in this post are only among the many who have attempted to challenge Haitian society’s systematic sexism in the earlier decades of the 20th century.