@4HNYC Helping Haiti HH

Impacting our World by Social Charitable Giving

61 notes

4hnyc:

A special thanks goes out to all of our supporters for their continuous support and generosity. As a result of your kindness, 4HNYC is able to sponsor 200 Kenbe La students in Port-au-Prince and Leogane, Haiti. Each student will receive a book bag filled with school supplies for the upcoming school year. We at 4HNYC believe that every child deserves a chance to succeed regardless of their economical state. Thank you for also believing in our vision.

Kenbe La—- Never Give Up!

Cheers,

4HNYC Team
www.facebook.com/4hnyc

For more details about 4HNYC, please contact 4hnycgives@gmail.com

Interested in joining our team? We would love to have you! Contact us via 4hnycgive@gmail.com

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haitianhistory:

Haitian President Paul Eugène Magloire (far left) and his American counterpart, Dwight D. Eisenhower (far right) with their respective wives (on opposite sides), Washington, D.C., United States,1955. 

Original Caption: “1/28/1955-Washington, DC-President and Mrs. Eisenhower are shown with President Paul E. Magloire of Haiti and his “First Lady,” when the Eisenhowers were guests of honor at a dinner given in a Washington hotel by President Magloire. The Chief Executive of the Haitian Republic is here on a nine-day official visit to Washington and New York. After which he will make an unofficial six-day visit to Nashville, Chicago and Boston.”

Image and Caption Credit: Courtesy of Corbis Images. 

haitianhistory:

Haitian President Paul Eugène Magloire (far left) and his American counterpart, Dwight D. Eisenhower (far right) with their respective wives (on opposite sides), Washington, D.C., United States,1955. 

Original Caption: “1/28/1955-Washington, DC-President and Mrs. Eisenhower are shown with President Paul E. Magloire of Haiti and his “First Lady,” when the Eisenhowers were guests of honor at a dinner given in a Washington hotel by President Magloire. The Chief Executive of the Haitian Republic is here on a nine-day official visit to Washington and New York. After which he will make an unofficial six-day visit to Nashville, Chicago and Boston.”

Image and Caption Credit: Courtesy of Corbis Images

16 notes

haitianhistory:

Watch Professor Matthew J. Smith, Lecturer in the Department of History and Anthropology at the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica and author of the book Red and Black in Haiti: Radicalism, Conflict, and Political Change, 1934-1957   which I highly recommend if you want to better understand the various consequences of the US Marine Occupation on pre-Duvalier Haitian politics and the role of the Haitian left in the same period —  in a conference at Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC | CRDI).

In this special lecture entitled The Caribbean and the Roots of the Haitian Diaspora, Prof. Smith looks at Haitian immigration. 

61 notes

4hnyc:

A special thanks goes out to all of our supporters for their continuous support and generosity. As a result of your kindness, 4HNYC is able to sponsor 200 Kenbe La students in Port-au-Prince and Leogane, Haiti. Each student will receive a book bag filled with school supplies for the upcoming school year. We at 4HNYC believe that every child deserves a chance to succeed regardless of their economical state. Thank you for also believing in our vision.

Kenbe La—- Never Give Up!

Cheers,

4HNYC Team
www.facebook.com/4hnyc

For more details about 4HNYC, please contact 4hnycgives@gmail.com

Interested in joining our team? We would love to have you! Contact us via 4hnycgive@gmail.com

(via onwingslikeseagulls)

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haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”

* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.