@4HNYC Helping Haiti HH

Impacting our World by Social Charitable Giving

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4hnyc:

Interested in joining the 4HNYC team? Are you passionate about changing the lives of Haitian children? Are you a shaker? Energetic and full of ideas?

4HNYC is currently looking for people who want to contribute to change and make a difference in Haiti.

4HNYC, is a group of concerned young professional in the tristate area who believe that through educating the Haitian youth, influential results can made to develop the country economically. 4HNYC hosts an annual happy hour on Haitian Flag geared to raising funds to supply book bags with school supplies for students. This year we were able to send 205 book bags to Haiti!

Join our team today! We look forward to hearing from you.

Contact info: www.facebook.com/4hnyc
4hnycgives@gmail.com

Thank you,

4HNYC Team

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4hnyc:

A special thanks goes out to all of our supporters for their continuous support and generosity. As a result of your kindness, 4HNYC is able to sponsor 200 Kenbe La students in Port-au-Prince and Leogane, Haiti. Each student will receive a book bag filled with school supplies for the upcoming school year. We at 4HNYC believe that every child deserves a chance to succeed regardless of their economical state. Thank you for also believing in our vision.

Kenbe La—- Never Give Up!

Cheers,

4HNYC Team
www.facebook.com/4hnyc

For more details about 4HNYC, please contact 4hnycgives@gmail.com

Interested in joining our team? We would love to have you! Contact us via 4hnycgive@gmail.com

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haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - July 22, 1795 - Treaty of Basel signed between France and Spain. 
While this second Treaty of Basel guaranteed the end of hostilities between the French Convention and the Spanish Crown, for both countries’ overseas colonies, the Treaty had larger implications as Spain ceded its share of Hispaniola (modern day Dominican Republic) to France.
In January 1801, assuming that Santo Domingo was now part of the French Empire (although never completely integrated to the latter), Toussaint Louverture pressured the local Spanish administration to give it up fully to his (and thus French) authority. Still in 1801 (July), Louverture proceeded in creating a Constitution for the entire island of Hispaniola in which he abolished slavery on both sides of the island and imposed new laws. Louverture’s gesture did come to cause much animosity between Dominicans and Haitians in later years. 
Map: Courtesy of The Louverture Project.

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - July 22, 1795 - Treaty of Basel signed between France and Spain. 

While this second Treaty of Basel guaranteed the end of hostilities between the French Convention and the Spanish Crown, for both countries’ overseas colonies, the Treaty had larger implications as Spain ceded its share of Hispaniola (modern day Dominican Republic) to France.

In January 1801, assuming that Santo Domingo was now part of the French Empire (although never completely integrated to the latter), Toussaint Louverture pressured the local Spanish administration to give it up fully to his (and thus French) authority. Still in 1801 (July), Louverture proceeded in creating a Constitution for the entire island of Hispaniola in which he abolished slavery on both sides of the island and imposed new laws. Louverture’s gesture did come to cause much animosity between Dominicans and Haitians in later years. 

Map: Courtesy of The Louverture Project.

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haitianphoenix:

"With the European powers engaged in World War I, President Woodrow Wilson feared that Germany might occupy Haiti and threaten the sea route to the Panama Canal. To protect U.S. interests and to restore order, the president sent 330 marines and sailors to Haiti.

The last marines did not leave Haiti until 1934. To ensure repayment of Haiti’s debts, the United States took over the collection of customs duties. Americans also arbitrated disputes, distributed food and medicine, censored the press, and ran military courts. In addition, the United States helped build about a thousand miles of unpaved roads and a number of agricultural and vocational schools, and trained the Haitian army and police. It also helped to replace a government led by blacks with a government headed by mulattoes. The U.S. forced the Haitians to adopt a new constitution which gave American businessmen the right to own land in Haiti. While campaigning for vice president in 1920, Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had served as assistant secretary of the Navy in the Wilson Administration, later boasted, “I wrote Haiti’s Constitution myself, and if I do say it, it was a pretty good little Constitution.”

Many Haitians resisted the American occupation. In the fall of 1918, Charlemagne Peralte, a former Haitian army officer, launched a guerrilla war against the U.S. Marines to protest a system of forced labor imposed by the United States to build roads in Haiti. In 1919, he was captured and killed by U.S. Marines, and his body was photographed against a door with a crucifix and a Haitian flag as a lesson to others. During the first five years of the occupation, American forces killed about 2,250 Haitians. In December 1929, U.S. Marines fired on a crowd of protesters armed with rocks and machetes, killing 12 and wounding 23. The incident stirred international condemnation and ultimately led to the end of the American occupation.” 
#haiti #ayiti #knowthyself #knowyourhistory #teamhaiti #teamayiti #ayibobo #unitedstates #wealth #history #theydontteachthis #haitiansbelike #sakpasse

haitianphoenix:

"With the European powers engaged in World War I, President Woodrow Wilson feared that Germany might occupy Haiti and threaten the sea route to the Panama Canal. To protect U.S. interests and to restore order, the president sent 330 marines and sailors to Haiti.

The last marines did not leave Haiti until 1934. To ensure repayment of Haiti’s debts, the United States took over the collection of customs duties. Americans also arbitrated disputes, distributed food and medicine, censored the press, and ran military courts. In addition, the United States helped build about a thousand miles of unpaved roads and a number of agricultural and vocational schools, and trained the Haitian army and police. It also helped to replace a government led by blacks with a government headed by mulattoes. The U.S. forced the Haitians to adopt a new constitution which gave American businessmen the right to own land in Haiti. While campaigning for vice president in 1920, Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had served as assistant secretary of the Navy in the Wilson Administration, later boasted, “I wrote Haiti’s Constitution myself, and if I do say it, it was a pretty good little Constitution.”

Many Haitians resisted the American occupation. In the fall of 1918, Charlemagne Peralte, a former Haitian army officer, launched a guerrilla war against the U.S. Marines to protest a system of forced labor imposed by the United States to build roads in Haiti. In 1919, he was captured and killed by U.S. Marines, and his body was photographed against a door with a crucifix and a Haitian flag as a lesson to others. During the first five years of the occupation, American forces killed about 2,250 Haitians. In December 1929, U.S. Marines fired on a crowd of protesters armed with rocks and machetes, killing 12 and wounding 23. The incident stirred international condemnation and ultimately led to the end of the American occupation.”
#haiti #ayiti #knowthyself #knowyourhistory #teamhaiti #teamayiti #ayibobo #unitedstates #wealth #history #theydontteachthis #haitiansbelike #sakpasse

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Haiti’s Underrated But Out-Sized Influence

eupraxsophy:

It is a shame that so few of us know how unique and influential Haiti’s role in history has been. After gaining independence in 1804 – following a decade-long war against one of the most powerful empires in the world – Haiti became the first and only nation in history to be established as a result of a successful slave revolt; many of its first political leaders were former slaves.

Haiti became…

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haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - July 28, 1915 - Beginning of a 19 years U.S. Marine Occupation of Haiti. 
Following the bloody assassination of Haitian President Vilbrun Guillaume Sam by an angry mob in Port-Au-Prince (in response to the equally bloody slaying of political prisoners days before), the United States felt it had no choice but to occupy the country to put an end to the violence and anarchy that had characterize Haitian politics since the late 19th century. 
While these were certainly part of Washington’s overall considerations, most historians have pointed out that, from the beginning of the 1900s onwards, the United States attempted to pressure different Haitian governments into accepting a “peaceful” intervention in the country. In the 1910s, the United States battled with French interests for the control of the Banque Nationale d’Haiti. A few years before, it also took control of the neighbouring Dominican Republic customs, thus becoming arbitrator of the country’s economy (and occupying it officially as of 1916). More importantly however, there were many (misguided) accounts that Haiti was on the verge of being controlled by German merchants who were a small but powerful community in the island. 
By 1915, one more incident was needed for the United States to enter Haiti and give its intervention the appearance of respecting international law. This “opportunity” came on the 28th of July and Marine forces occupied Haiti for the next 19 years.  
Image: Courtesy of Corbis Images. //// Source and Further Reading: X and X 

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - July 28, 1915 - Beginning of a 19 years U.S. Marine Occupation of Haiti. 

Following the bloody assassination of Haitian President Vilbrun Guillaume Sam by an angry mob in Port-Au-Prince (in response to the equally bloody slaying of political prisoners days before), the United States felt it had no choice but to occupy the country to put an end to the violence and anarchy that had characterize Haitian politics since the late 19th century. 

While these were certainly part of Washington’s overall considerations, most historians have pointed out that, from the beginning of the 1900s onwards, the United States attempted to pressure different Haitian governments into accepting a “peaceful” intervention in the country. In the 1910s, the United States battled with French interests for the control of the Banque Nationale d’Haiti. A few years before, it also took control of the neighbouring Dominican Republic customs, thus becoming arbitrator of the country’s economy (and occupying it officially as of 1916). More importantly however, there were many (misguided) accounts that Haiti was on the verge of being controlled by German merchants who were a small but powerful community in the island. 

By 1915, one more incident was needed for the United States to enter Haiti and give its intervention the appearance of respecting international law. This “opportunity” came on the 28th of July and Marine forces occupied Haiti for the next 19 years.  

Image: Courtesy of Corbis Images. //// Source and Further Reading: X and X 

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Haiti Celebrates Carnaval des Fleurs - Caribbean Journal

rapadoo:

Haiti Celebrates Carnaval des Fleurs – Caribbean Journal

Ahead of the event, Haiti President Michel Martelly said the “great cultural event” was an “opportunity for Haiti to sell a better image of itself and attract tourists.”He said the progress over the festival since 2012 would have a “positive economic impact on the commercial sector in particular.”Last year, approximately 22,000 people came to Haiti during the 10-day period that included the…

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haitianhistory:

To “celebrate” the 99th anniversary of the U.S. Occupation of Haiti (1915-1934), here is a brief selection of primary documents that relate to it in some form. Of course many documents were omitted from this list as they are difficult to access online, most notably the Robert Moton Commission of 1930.

* What are primary sources? How do I read them and replace them in their proper historical contingency?

Occupation era (1915-1934) documents

  • Haitian-American Treaty of September 1915 - (EN)
  • Constitution of 1918  - (FR)
  • The Truth about Haiti: An NAACP Investigation by James Weldon Johnson, 1920 - (EN)
  • Self-determining Haiti by James Weldon Johnson, 1920 - (EN)
  • Eleventh Annual Report of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1921 - (EN)
  • Inquiry Into Occupation and Administration of Haiti and Santo Domingo (Record of proceedings of a court of inquiry), 1921 - (EN)
  • Conclusions and Recommendations by the Committee of Six Disinterested Americans, 1926 - (EN)
  • Ainsi Parla l’Oncle by Jean Price-Mars, 1928 - (FR
  • United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, 1930 - (EN)
  • Constitution of 1932 -  (FR)
  • Constitution of 1935 - (FR)
  • En posant les jalons by Sténio Vincent, 1939 - (FR)

Legend: FR = Français / EN = English  /// Original Images: Courtesy of Corbis Images, Haiti Reference and Wikimedia Commons.