@4HNYC Helping Haiti HH

Impacting our World by Social Charitable Giving

26 notes

4hnyc:

About 4HNYC….

4HNYC presents the 3rd Annual Helping Haiti Happy Hour… The Day Party Edition (4HNYC - https://www.eventbrite.com/e/3rd-annual-helping-haiti-happy-hour-the-day-party-edition-tickets-10532419751 ) is a fundraiser put on by a group of concerned young professionals in the New York City area to raise money for children in poverty in Haiti.

We’re collecting school supplies donations as well as monetary donations. Here are a list of supplies that we are collecting:

Toothbrush

Toothpaste

Floss

Hand sanitizer

First aid kits (band-aids, etc.)

Socks (children and adults)

Sandals

School supplies (crayons, pencils, erasers, notebooks, construction paper…)

Our goal is to fill up 350 his/her sling bags for children in Haiti as well as distribute clothing.

Location of the event:

West 3rd Common (in Noho)

1 West 3rd Street
New York, NY 10012

Between Broadway and Mercer

More info of venue: 
 http://www.west3rdcommon.com

Helping Haiti Happy Hour Chairperson Nohemie Pascal Says:

"A family member of mine recently took a trip to Haiti and shared pictures and stories of some of the things that he saw there. It shocked me and my heart went out to them (especially being from Haitian descent, it hit home). Despite the fact that Haiti was no longer the trending topic on Twitter or Facebook. And not on the cover of every newspaper or on every news channel, Haiti still needed help. I didn’t want the people of Haiti to think that we had forgotten about them.

The country is still in the rebuilding phase and I think every little bit counts. If I can bring a smile or some kind of joy in someone else’s life, why not?! You’d be amazed the little things we take for granted mean the world to others.

I also, want for people to be able to track their donations and share the experience by viewing pictures of the 4HNYC fundraiser journey. From beginning to end. Be able to see volunteers stuffing bags and even be able to see the children with their bags. Just be able to see the difference they have made and how they impacted children in Haiti.”

About The Event:
The event is Sunday, May 18, 2014 between the hours of 3-8pm. May 18th is also Fête du drapeau (which means flag day). The event is on Haitian flag day.

Who can participate? EVERYONE

Target population to get to donate? EVERYONE

We want to get young professionals involved and excited about helping and giving back! We are also, auctioning off amazing prices that you do not want to miss out on. First 50 people to arrive at the event will receive a gift bag.

Contact info:

Nohemie Pascal: 
4hnycgives@gmail.com
www.4hnyc.com
Twitter: @4HNYC (http://www.twitter.com/4hnyc) https://www.eventbrite.com/e/3rd-annual-helping-haiti-happy-hour-the-day-party-edition-tickets-10532419751


Sponsors Include:
7 Days 7 Nights Caribbean, HBK, Graham and Peters, My Haiti Travels, In Lieu Of Movement, 
Jumpstart HR , Miss Mimi, and Jody Marlock.

41 notes

haitianhistory:

Port-au-Prince, Haiti , late 1940s and early 1950s. CIDIHCA.

This is a very beautiful (perhaps a touch too romanticized and poetic) video of Port-Au-Prince in the decades before the advent of Duvalier. It’s a very interesting piece, in part to see some of the city’s evolution. Also, it features very nice Haitian merengue for those interested in music. * I must say the video is narrated in French, but only seeing the images should capture the essence of the message.

Although I prefer to stay neutral with my opinions at all times, and we must remember this is only a selective piece of history, I dare say this will contrast quiet sharply with what many of you are used to seeing.

34 notes

ebonymag:

EBONY visited École Herve Romain, a school in Port-au-Prince’s red zone run by charity organization Edeyo. @JetBlue Airlines along with Wings of Help donated books, laptops, wifi and clothing.
Photography by Toya Menzie (@thelimericklane)

ebonymag:

EBONY visited École Herve Romain, a school in Port-au-Prince’s red zone run by charity organization Edeyo. @JetBlue Airlines along with Wings of Help donated books, laptops, wifi and clothing.

Photography by Toya Menzie (@thelimericklane)

143 notes

haitianhistory:

Artwork: Mujer criolla y criadas by Agostino Brunias (Source) 
Racial and Social Classes in colonial Saint-Domingue (Haiti)
I. Whites - Grands Blancs 
The Grands Blancs were: usually wealthy whites; born in Europe or of direct European ancestry; owned most of the land, plantations and slaves in the colony; had the greatest access to political power in the domestic affairs of Saint-Domingue; usually did as they pleased in the colony; numbered around 30, 826 (with the Petits Blancs) by the outbreak of the French Revolution (1789)
Whites - Petit Blancs 
The Petits Blancs were: typically poor (or poorer) whites; usually owned neither land nor slaves; little real political power; occupy secondary functions in the colony (usually as overseers, innkeepers, sailors or soldiers); many were former indentured servants; felt much antagonism towards most of the population; could not make full alliance with the Grands Blancs despite color (usually because considered too poor); could not make any alliance with the free coloreds because too racist and jealous of the success of the latter; want to become Grands Blancs but often experience a lot of difficulty; still many did better than some free coloreds; numbered around 30, 826 (with the Grands Blancs) by the 1789.
II. Free Coloreds - Gens de Couleur Libres & Affranchis 
The Gens de Couleur Libres and Affranchis were: ** not all mulattoes or quadroons; some born free, others into slavery; a very complex group; sometimes mixed-race (usually the product of an union between white French men and (more often then not) enslaved Black women, as the case with André Rigaud); sometimes Black (like Toussaint Louverture, who had purchased his freedom and became an Affranchi); many were educated in France; some became considerably wealthy and owned plantations and slaves; rarely treated those slaves with more regards then their white counterparts (because of the established system and desire to keep social distinction alive); not considered equal to whites and often experienced humiliation and discrimination; most important characteristic was that they were “people of color” who were not slaves; many of those who remained in Haiti after the Revolution became part of the emerging elite; numbered around 27, 548 by 1789.
III. Slaves 
The slaves were: essentially considered property; regardless of the Code Noir of 1685, had little real legal protection in practice; enjoyed almost no control over their lives, bodies, labour, sexuality or offspring; separated by the rest of the population by law; number of slaves in island increased considerably every year, not by normal reproductive activity, but due to significant importation of new slaves; experienced different lives if were house slaves, plantation slaves or urban domestic slaves; life expectancy varied with type of labour; plantation slaves usually estimated to live around 10 years after arrival to Saint-Domingue (some scholars argue less); many ran away to escape conditions and formed maroon communities, if only for few months; numbered around 465, 429 by 1789.
Few Observations 
Overall, while Saint-Domingue was a “typical” slave island for the 18th century, a few observations could be made. First, due to the vast import of African slaves each year to the island, whites were easily outnumbered by a ratio of about 15 to 1. This did not appear particularly alarming to most as they believed the slaves would never “even think” of rebelling and were overall passive creatures, incapable of intellectual or physical desire for freedom. 
Another interesting feature of Saint-Domingue is that it possessed one of the fasting growing Gens de Couleur Libres (free people of color/free coloreds) populations. Many of those individuals enjoyed European education and wealth, therefore competed directly with the white population by challenging typical racial and social hierarchies. Increasingly by 1769, Saint-Domingue’s local administrators attempted to limit the social mobility of the Gens de Couleur Libres by excluding them from occupying certain functions in the colony. Racial and color lines were becoming much more rigid than they had before, so much so that there were fewer nuptials between wealthy Gens de Couleur Libres and aspiring white families (a practice that had been fairly common only decades earlier). Moreover, various laws were passed around the same time to segregate whites from free coloreds in churches, theatres, dance halls and other public areas. Despite growing antagonism from the white population - as an increasingly important planter and slave-owning class - most of the free coloreds did not initially think of an alliance with the slave population. 
All in all, by the eve of the French Revolution, which drastically influenced the outbreak and earlier episodes of the Haitian Revolution, the social climate in Saint-Domingue was already tense. 
[ Source, Source, Source, Source, Source & Source ]

haitianhistory:

Artwork: Mujer criolla y criadas by Agostino Brunias (Source)

Racial and Social Classes in colonial Saint-Domingue (Haiti)

I. Whites - Grands Blancs 

The Grands Blancs were: usually wealthy whites; born in Europe or of direct European ancestry; owned most of the land, plantations and slaves in the colony; had the greatest access to political power in the domestic affairs of Saint-Domingue; usually did as they pleased in the colony; numbered around 30, 826 (with the Petits Blancs) by the outbreak of the French Revolution (1789)

Whites - Petit Blancs

The Petits Blancs were: typically poor (or poorer) whites; usually owned neither land nor slaves; little real political power; occupy secondary functions in the colony (usually as overseers, innkeepers, sailors or soldiers); many were former indentured servants; felt much antagonism towards most of the population; could not make full alliance with the Grands Blancs despite color (usually because considered too poor); could not make any alliance with the free coloreds because too racist and jealous of the success of the latter; want to become Grands Blancs but often experience a lot of difficulty; still many did better than some free coloreds; numbered around 30, 826 (with the Grands Blancs) by the 1789.

II. Free Coloreds - Gens de Couleur Libres & Affranchis

The Gens de Couleur Libres and Affranchis were: ** not all mulattoes or quadroons; some born free, others into slavery; a very complex group; sometimes mixed-race (usually the product of an union between white French men and (more often then not) enslaved Black women, as the case with André Rigaud); sometimes Black (like Toussaint Louverture, who had purchased his freedom and became an Affranchi); many were educated in France; some became considerably wealthy and owned plantations and slaves; rarely treated those slaves with more regards then their white counterparts (because of the established system and desire to keep social distinction alive); not considered equal to whites and often experienced humiliation and discrimination; most important characteristic was that they were “people of color” who were not slaves; many of those who remained in Haiti after the Revolution became part of the emerging elite; numbered around 27, 548 by 1789.

III. Slaves

The slaves were: essentially considered property; regardless of the Code Noir of 1685, had little real legal protection in practice; enjoyed almost no control over their lives, bodies, labour, sexuality or offspring; separated by the rest of the population by law; number of slaves in island increased considerably every year, not by normal reproductive activity, but due to significant importation of new slaves; experienced different lives if were house slaves, plantation slaves or urban domestic slaves; life expectancy varied with type of labour; plantation slaves usually estimated to live around 10 years after arrival to Saint-Domingue (some scholars argue less); many ran away to escape conditions and formed maroon communities, if only for few months; numbered around 465, 429 by 1789.

Few Observations

Overall, while Saint-Domingue was a “typical” slave island for the 18th century, a few observations could be made. First, due to the vast import of African slaves each year to the island, whites were easily outnumbered by a ratio of about 15 to 1. This did not appear particularly alarming to most as they believed the slaves would never “even think” of rebelling and were overall passive creatures, incapable of intellectual or physical desire for freedom.

Another interesting feature of Saint-Domingue is that it possessed one of the fasting growing Gens de Couleur Libres (free people of color/free coloreds) populations. Many of those individuals enjoyed European education and wealth, therefore competed directly with the white population by challenging typical racial and social hierarchies. Increasingly by 1769, Saint-Domingue’s local administrators attempted to limit the social mobility of the Gens de Couleur Libres by excluding them from occupying certain functions in the colony. Racial and color lines were becoming much more rigid than they had before, so much so that there were fewer nuptials between wealthy Gens de Couleur Libres and aspiring white families (a practice that had been fairly common only decades earlier). Moreover, various laws were passed around the same time to segregate whites from free coloreds in churches, theatres, dance halls and other public areas. Despite growing antagonism from the white population - as an increasingly important planter and slave-owning class - most of the free coloreds did not initially think of an alliance with the slave population.

All in all, by the eve of the French Revolution, which drastically influenced the outbreak and earlier episodes of the Haitian Revolution, the social climate in Saint-Domingue was already tense.

[ SourceSource, Source, Source, Source & Source ]